Tagged: Nokia

Nokia Makes Turn-by-Turn Ovi Maps Free for All

In an unexpected move, Nokia have announced that the new version of Ovi Maps will feature free walk and drive navigation, a change from their previous subscription based model for this service.  Ovi Maps was always free of course, but if you wanted it to tell you where to go – in the nicest possible way – then you had to cross their palm with silver.

The maps cover 70 countries worldwide and in addition to the walk and drive navigation, provide Lonely Planet and Michelin guides, plus localized event details.  You can add favorites and share you location via Facebook, and just like previous versions, all future updates will be free too.

The new platform is available now from the Nokia Maps website, and is compatible with a variety of Nokia smart phones including the new X6, the N97 Mini, the E52 and E55 and the other ‘navigation’ editions of the 5800, 5230, 6730 and the 6710.

Nokia’s decision to make the full Ovi Maps service free has obviously been influenced by the latest version of Google Maps, which includes free turn-by-turn navigation too.  Just how this will affect the makers of standalone GPS units remains to be seen, but there are likely to be some concerned faces in boardrooms across the country this morning.

Source: http://www.dialaphone.co.uk/

Nokia 6700 slide cheap 5mp camera phone

Nokia announced about this phone little early and it will be available at the Q1 of year 2010. According to Nokia, this phone is going to be cheap. Nokia 6700 slide is a 5Mp camera phone which has lots of other new features. It’s a 3G phone and supports 10.2MBP/s 3g HSDPA speed. This phone has Bluetooth but Wi-Fi is not available. 

The internal memory of this phone is 45MB and it supports up to 16GB memory cards. Also Nokia 6700 slide comes with a 2GB memory card included. 
As I mentioned earlier Nokia 6700 slide has a 5MP camera. This camera made with Nokia’s Carl Zeiss optics and has a LED flash. This phone has a FM radio with RDS, also GPS is not available but it comes with Nokia Maps application. 

Source: http://bestnewphones.blogspot.com/

Windows Mobile to reach 15% of smartphones in 2013.

In spite of common perception, Windows Mobile could take second place in the smartphone market in as little as four years, an iSuppli study predicted today. Analysts estimate that the phones shipped will triple from 27.7 million by the end of this year to 67.9 million in 2013, or enough to give it 15.3 percent of the industry behind Nokia’s predicted 47.6 percent. Microsoft is expected to slip to third this year but to recover over time.

The return to form is founded in a belief that Microsoft has the “major cards” needed to have a successful mobile platform. Windows Mobile is already well established with carrier support and a substantial app library, while it now also has an app store (Windows Marketplace for Mobile).

Its age is considered a problem, as its interface is harder to use than an iPhone’s and doesn’t support the capacitive touchscreens needed for multi-touch and other more intuitive finger input. However, senior analyst Tina Teng believes the launch of Windows Mobile 7 in 2010 will render Microsoft “much more competitive” precisely because it should solve both of these problems. She also dismisses the losses of Motorola and Palm as clients for Windows Mobile, saying that neither were significant enough to make an impact while the recent addition of LG will be much more important. Windows Mobile has more licenses than anyone with 14 versus Symbian’s 10.

The study doesn’t address Nokia’s own falling market share or outside factors, such as the maturation of younger platforms like Android and iPhone. Android has often been cited as the most direct competitor to Windows Mobile as it can be licensed by nearly any developer but is significantly less expensive to license and develop than Windows Mobile.

Source: http:/ipod-iphone.blogspot.com/

Nokia Debuts X6 “Comes With Music” Smartphone

Nearly three months after it first appeared online, the Nokia X6 has officially been released in the UK and will be available direct from Nokia’s website for £449 unlocked.

The phone, which we first reported in September 2009, has a 3.2-inch touchscreen that can display 640×360 pixels, 32GB built-in storage and a 5-megapixel camera with dual LED flash and a Carl Zeiss lens.

The rest of the features are pretty similar to the Nokia N97 although the X6 is powered by a 433MHz ARM processor, significantly lower than the rest of the competition.

We noted last time that the X6 might well be one of Nokia’s sexiest mobile phones yet but that ultimately, Apple “owns” the high end segment simply because it has a much better application solution in the shape of the App store.

The X6 is currently available at Phones4U exclusively and will be on sale on contracts starting from £35 per month. Interested N-series customers will be pleased to know that they can trade in their phones and get a £10 monthly discount.

Source: http://www.itproportal.com/

Spotify announces Symbian app

Spotify has expanded its mobile reach with a launch onto the Symbian platform – a potentially huge new audience spanning around half of the global smartphone market.

As well as a large range of Nokia handsets, the app will also run on a selection of Sony Ericsson and Samsung smartphones running the Symbian platform, such as the Samsung GT-I8910 Omnia HD and Sony Ericsson Satio.

To get Spotify’s Symbian application, users can either download it directly to their phones by visiting m.spotify.com through their mobile web browser, or by entering their phone number on the new Symbian information page to receive instructions via an SMS.

As with the other iPhone and Android Spotify offerings, the Symbian app is only available to those who are Premium, i.e., paid-up members of the service.

Nokia N97 Mini White Edition Launched

The Nokia N97 Mini launched a couple of weeks back and came in its shiny Cherry Black livery, which if we’re honest has more than a hint of copper brown to it. However, it’s time to start getting excited about the Nokia N97 Mini White Edition, as it’s popped up exclusively on Phones4u. Find out how to get your hands on a Nokia N97 Mini White Edition for free after the jump…

 

With its 3.2-inch screen, full QWERTY slide-out keyboard and 5-Megapixel Carl Zeiss optics camera, the Nokia N97 Mini White Edition is very much the same as the standard version but happens to come in a stunning crystal white livery.

 

As was suggested last week, the Nokia N97 Mini White Edition has popped up as an exclusive to retailer Phones4u and is tied to an Orange contract at the moment. This has us wondering if and when (and to whom) the Nokia N97 Mini Black Edition will be offered by, as we’ve still not heard anything about this handset.

 

You can get the Nokia N97 Mini White Edition for free and pay just £25 a month on an 18-month contract. For this, you’ll get the best looking Nokia N97 Mini around, as well as 600 minutes talk-time and 3000 texts a month.

 

So, thinking of plumbing for the Nokia N97 Mini? Let us know which version you like the best in the Comments below.

 

Resource: http://noknok.tv/

Nokia N900: A computer in every pocket

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Smartphones are often described as “pocket computers” but, despite advances in usability and processing power, many fall short of providing a user experience comparable to a desktop or laptop computer’s.

Nokia’s new device aims to change that. The Finnish mobile-phone maker, the largest handset manufacturer in the world, has been losing market share to the likes of Apple and BlackBerry manufacturer Research in Motion, and recent efforts to develop cutting-edge, touch-screen devices have received a mixed reception from industry experts and consumers.

That’s why the launch of the company’s latest phone will be crucial: the Nokia N900, which goes on sale this month, is set to be the most powerful mobile phone on the market – a true pocket computer.

The device, which received rave reviews when it was demonstrated at a technology summit last month, has all the features we’ve come to expect from the modern smartphone: fast internet access, 3.5in touch-screen, plenty of storage, high-quality digital camera and access to an app store to download extra software, games and tools.

It also has a slide-out Qwerty keyboard, which is sure to divide opinion. Some users still favour a physical keyboard for quickly tapping out messages on the move; others believe touch-screen devices should rely on a virtual keyboard, as the iPhone does, and that adding a physical keyboard is an admission that the interface isn’t up to scratch.

Crucially, the phone will be turbocharged by high-calibre processors, but by far its most important element is the operating system, which promises a powerhouse performance that could put the iPhone to shame.

The N900 runs Maemo, a Linux-based operating system developed by Nokia that has been designed to bring many features of desktop computing to a mobile device. Nokia has previously used the software on its internet tablets, but the N900 will be the first mobile phone to use this slick platform.

As a result, users can create multiple “desktops” – separate home screens dedicated to, say, listening to music, or enabling them to contact friends with a single click – and switch between these desktops simply by skimming a finger across the screen. The device can run multiple applications simultaneously, enabling users to get instant notifications when they receive an email or instant message, and it offers a full web browser based on the same architecture as Mozilla’s Firefox browser. Users will also be able to download games and software from Nokia’s embryonic Ovi app store.

As with the Palm Pre, released last month, the N900 makes no distinction between the ways in which you choose to correspond: it will assemble communications into a single “thread” whether those conversations took place by phone, text, email or instant message.

“The philosophy behind Maemo was to find a way of bringing computer technology to a mobile device,” says Janne Heikkinen, director of product planning for Nokia. “We wanted to introduce a true internet experience in a pocketable form.”

Heikkinen believes the N900’s multitasking capabilities will go down especially well. “People always have multiple windows and programs open on their computer at home. When they browse the internet, they have multiple tabs open and switch between those. That is the sort of experience people now want on a mobile device. The user interface and architecture behind Maemo means that we can bring lots of new capabilities to users.”

He sees the device as sitting somewhere between a standard smartphone and a ultra-portable netbook computer, and says it is targeted at technology enthusiasts. “This will be the most powerful mobile device on the market, not just because of the technical merits, but because of how the user interface and overall architecture support multitasking and the other functions. We also see it as a very important innovation platform for developers.”

Industry experts, too, believe it could be a game changer. “Maemo will deliver the next generation of ‘computer-like’ experiences,” says Geoff Blaber, an analyst with CCS Insight. “The emphasis on rich visuals and multitasking is key. Multitasking will become increasingly important in a world where the phone is being used to access multiple functions, applications and services. It’s a challenge that Apple faces with the iPhone.”

Indeed, Apple’s engineers are likely to pay close attention to the N900. Despite the intuitive nature of the iPhone interface, its inability to run multiple applications simultaneously could become a problem as other mobile phone-makers continue to innovate.

Google’s operating system, Android, is also building up a head of steam, and is now available on a wide variety of well-designed, easy-to-use handsets that offer plenty of innovative features.

Although it remains to be seen how the N900 resonates with consumers, one thing is clear; the idea of truly having a computer in your pocket just moved a big step closer.

Source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/