Tagged: Google

Apple has been always come up with good ideas?

Patents are very important — they help the small guys with really great ideas protect themselves. They give those people and companies a real chance in a world that’s dominated by large organizations that build their business on stealing great ideas. That said, holding a patent isn’t a sure-fire way to protect yourself, but it certainly helps.

When large companies use their portfolio of patents to squeeze out competition, however, it really should be considered anti-competitive. A good example of how patents shouldn’t be used is how Apple is trying flex their muscles to HTC, which is infringing their generic “multi-touch” patent. Thankfully for HTC, Google is on their side, and won’t let Apple have their way.

Most people would agree that the patent system is broken, and something has to be done about it. Most companies play nice, and don’t threaten legal action — in fact, patents are used as the proverbial “First!” in a lot of cases — bragging rights. Apple, for instance, has lots of patents that are really cool — like the one that makes tactile user input possible on a touch screen.

Perhaps Apple is afraid that they will not be able to innovate past multi-touch, and protecting their patent is the only way to ensure their future success.

Source: http://blogs.zdnet.com/

Journalism Degrees

 

 

 

Photoshop.com Mobile for Android handsets released

adobe-photoshop-android

iPhone users got to lay their hands on the Adobe Photoshop.com Mobile and now it’s the turn of Android owners to explore this innovative software. The Android application offers users quick and easy image-editing tools, color adjustments and instant photo-sharing capabilities.

The photo editing application enhances the camera-phone experience by enabling users to browse for their photos online and on their Android device, right from the handset. Some of the functionalities that the Photoshop.com Mobile app offers include crop, rotate and flip.

“Adobe is excited to extend its digital imaging capabilities to Android phone users so they can take control of their growing collections of mobile photos. Photoshop.com Mobile is a great resource to edit, upload and share photos in a few short moments. It’s the perfect complement to the mobile phone cameras found on Android devices,” stated Doug Mack, vice president and general manager of Consumer and Hosted Solutions at Adobe.

With the Soft Focus filter, users can create a subtle blur effect and also carry out color adjustments such as exposure, saturation, tint changes and classic black-and-white. Further, users can also upload their edited photos from their mobile phone to their Photoshop.com account via an Internet-connected computer.

Owing to the Android API, new tab-based user interface allows users to view local and online content. Android users can also automatically upload pictures to Photoshop.com albums in the background, even when the Photoshop.com Mobile application is not running.

The Adobe Photoshop.com Mobile for Android application can be downloaded for free from the Android Market.

 

Source: http://www.mobiletor.com/

Analysis: Google’s Dashboard Tackles Transparency

Google Dashboard

One product stood out this week amongst the standard flurry of Google product releases. It wasn’t a Gmail Labs experiment or a new parameter for search. It was a fairly unassuming new product called Dashboard, which aggregates users’ personal information from more than 20 Google services into a single, password-protected page.

Google unveiled the new service with a blog post titled, “Transparency, choice, and control – now complete with a Dashboard.” The choice and control parts of the equation are pretty clear – users can update their account information directly from the new Dashboard, which is far handier than being forced to visit each page individually.

However, the fact that Google opted to lead its Dashboard blog post with the word “transparency” speaks to a fundamental concern about the company’s current position in the world. Some time ago, the company adopted the admirable motto “Don’t Be Evil,” a slogan pundits have often suggested is a dig at Microsoft.

As Google quickly discovered, however, the adherence to such an abstract notion is at times inversely proportional to the size of a company. As a company grows, opportunities for evil become more numerous, and the ability to police them decreases. Things get even trickier when a company’s stated objective is to gather and catalog all the world’s information.

Over the past few years, concerns about the “anti-evil” corporation have grown at nearly the same rate as the company itself, from its cooperation with the Chinese government to the cameras it perches atop its Street View vans. The sheer breadth of Google’s knowledge base is staggering, something that becomes far more apparent on a personal level when one investigates their own Dashboard.

But if Google has always been so devoted to transparency, why are we only seeing this feature rolled out now?

The answer is that, ultimately, even the most noble corporation is only as transparent as they have to be. The good news, however, is that in this post-Web 2.0 world, the bare minimum is ever increasing. As personal information becomes more publicly available, the same goes for corporate information. The informational megaphone that is Twitter and the blogosphere makes protests all the more powerful.

Remember Amazonfail, the Twitter protest against a seemingly homophobic move on the part of the online retailer? What about the online kerfuffle surrounding Facebook’s new Terms of Service? When information moves at the speed of the Web, corporations must operate at a similar pace. This means more than just creating a corporate Twitter account, it means offering information in anticipation of complaints, which is where the concept of transparency comes into play. Companies that make information publicly available have less to hide, and it therefore becomes more difficult to bandy about words like “evil.” Sunlight, as the saying goes, is the best disinfectant.

While the advent of Dashboard can be seen as a response to past criticism and an attempt to avoid future accusations, the availability of information like our Web history does have the effect of bringing to light even more questions — such as what exactly does Google plan to do with our information? It’s a reminder that, as we hand more and more of our own personal information over to a company like Google, we need to keep asking questions.

Fortunately, the Internet is history’s most powerful suggestion box, and if corporations want to operate in that world, they have to listen.

One product stood out this week amongst the standard flurry of Google product releases. It wasn’t a Gmail Labs experiment or a new parameter for search. It was a fairly unassuming new product called Dashboard, which aggregates users’ personal information from more than 20 Google services into a single, password-protected page.

Google unveiled the new service with a blog post titled, “Transparency, choice, and control – now complete with a Dashboard.” The choice and control parts of the equation are pretty clear – users can update their account information directly from the new Dashboard, which is far handier than being forced to visit each page individually.

However, the fact that Google opted to lead its Dashboard blog post with the word “transparency” speaks to a fundamental concern about the company’s current position in the world. Some time ago, the company adopted the admirable motto “Don’t Be Evil,” a slogan pundits have often suggested is a dig at Microsoft.

As Google quickly discovered, however, the adherence to such an abstract notion is at times inversely proportional to the size of a company. As a company grows, opportunities for evil become more numerous, and the ability to police them decreases. Things get even trickier when a company’s stated objective is to gather and catalog all the world’s information.

Over the past few years, concerns about the “anti-evil” corporation have grown at nearly the same rate as the company itself, from its cooperation with the Chinese government to the cameras it perches atop its Street View vans. The sheer breadth of Google’s knowledge base is staggering, something that becomes far more apparent on a personal level when one investigates their own Dashboard.

But if Google has always been so devoted to transparency, why are we only seeing this feature rolled out now?

The answer is that, ultimately, even the most noble corporation is only as transparent as they have to be. The good news, however, is that in this post-Web 2.0 world, the bare minimum is ever increasing. As personal information becomes more publicly available, the same goes for corporate information. The informational megaphone that is Twitter and the blogosphere makes protests all the more powerful.

Remember Amazonfail, the Twitter protest against a seemingly homophobic move on the part of the online retailer? What about the online kerfuffle surrounding Facebook’s new Terms of Service? When information moves at the speed of the Web, corporations must operate at a similar pace. This means more than just creating a corporate Twitter account, it means offering information in anticipation of complaints, which is where the concept of transparency comes into play. Companies that make information publicly available have less to hide, and it therefore becomes more difficult to bandy about words like “evil.” Sunlight, as the saying goes, is the best disinfectant.

While the advent of Dashboard can be seen as a response to past criticism and an attempt to avoid future accusations, the availability of information like our Web history does have the effect of bringing to light even more questions — such as what exactly does Google plan to do with our information? It’s a reminder that, as we hand more and more of our own personal information over to a company like Google, we need to keep asking questions.

Fortunately, the Internet is history’s most powerful suggestion box, and if corporations want to operate in that world, they have to listen.

Source: http://www.pcmag.com/

Sony Ericsson Embraces Android With Xperia X10 Smartphone

sony_ericsson_xpera

Sony Ericsson has officially launched the Xperia X10, formerly known as the X3 or Rachael, a smartphone that is the first device build by the company using Google’s Android platform.

(ed: no confusion here with the X10 Wireless Security Cameras ads that flooded the net a few years ago) Just like HTC with its Sense user interface, Sony Ericsson has chosen to overlay the default Android UI with a new touchscreen user interface which it calls the UX platform and will provide “unrivalled” integration of “social media services” – think Facebook, Twitter, MSN and will allow the phone’s users to “truly humanise the way people interact with their phones”.

One executive vice president of Sony Ericsson, Rikko Sakaguchi, said in a statement that “With the X10, we are raising the bar we have set ourselves with entertainment-rich phones like Aino and Satio by making communication more fun and playful, multiplying and enriching opportunities to connect.”

The Satio and the Aino were two Symbian-based smartphones that were released back in October but aim at a slightly less upmarket audience compared to the X10 which will be the flagship model in Sony Ericsson’s 2010 range of devices.

Sources: http://www.itproportal.com/

Google’s new OS could hit Microsoft, see where it hurts

Google-new-2It’s the ultimate showdown in the technology world, the clash of giants that has been eagerly awaited for years. Web giant Google is taking its clearest aim yet at Microsoft with its plan to produce its own operating system that would optimise the way computers work on the Internet.

The Chrome operating system is due to be out in the second half of next year and will initially be used in netbooks, company executives Sundar Pichai and Linus Upson said in a blog posting. The operating system would be released as free, open-source software, which would allow anyone to use or modify it.

At the core of Google’s vision is the most important trend in the networked world: the move from running applications on a desktop computer to running them through a web browser.

From Gmail to Facebook and Picassa to Twitter, the most popular uses for computers are no longer the disc-churning software programmes like Microsoft Office, which have clogged up hard drives for years. The new paradigm is cloud-based computing, where all the heavy lifting and storage is done on companies’ server farms, which people access over their broadband connections.

According to Google, it’s time that computers reflected the change.

“The operating systems that browsers run on were designed in an era where there was no web,” Google executives Sundar Pichai and Linus Upson wrote in a blog posting announcing the move.

The Chrome operating system is Google’s “attempt to re-think what operating systems should be”, based on three key attributes: “speed, simplicity and security”.

“We’re designing the OS to be fast and lightweight, to start up and get you on to the web in a few seconds. We are completely redesigning the underlying security architecture of the OS so that users don’t have to deal with viruses, malware and security updates. It should just work.”

That vision sounds like digital heaven for computer users who have wrestled forever with bloated software and computers that progressively get slower and slower.

“People want to get to their email instantly, without wasting time waiting for their computers to boot and browsers to start up. They want their computers to always run as fast as when they first bought them,” the Google blog said.

“They want their data to be accessible to them wherever they are and not have to worry about losing their computer or forgetting to back up files. Even more importantly, they don’t want to spend hours configuring their computers to work with every new piece of hardware or have to worry about constant software updates.”

As enticing as that prospect may seem, it’s not guaranteed to work, says Don Retallack, vice president of research at Directions on Microsoft – a company that tracks the software giant.

“Google may or may not have the experience and capability of actually producing an operating system and getting it deployed,” he said. “It may not realise how hard it is.”

Source: http://www.siliconindia.com/